Teen Pregnancy Does Not Have to Lead to Dropping out of School

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Teen Pregnancy Does Not Have to Lead to Dropping out of School

Half of 20- to 29-year-old women who gave birth in their teens have a high school diploma, according to research by Child Trends.

Half of 20- to 29-year-old women who gave birth in their teens have a high school diploma, according to research by Child Trends.

Child Trends

Half of 20- to 29-year-old women who gave birth in their teens have a high school diploma, according to research by Child Trends.

Child Trends

Child Trends

Half of 20- to 29-year-old women who gave birth in their teens have a high school diploma, according to research by Child Trends.

Myasiah Bilola, Junior

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Though parenthood is something that’s a part of most students’ long-range plans, some students find themselves facing parenthood sooner rather than later.

The consequences for teens  can be very serious. For example, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Pregnancy and birth are significant contributors to high school dropout rates among girls. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by 22 years of age, whereas approximately 90% of women who do not give birth during adolescence graduate from high school.”

But teen parenthood does not have to be the death of a student’s success in school.

Students should know there are options and resources available in Baltimore County schools to help teenagers navigating pregnancy and parenthood succeed at finishing school. In Baltimore County, pregnant teens are offered the option of completing their schooling through Home and Hospital as this allows the teen mother to be there for her child while also being able to stay up to date with school work. Tutors are even able to come to the home and assist with work. This support is a great opportunity for young mothers to feel supported in completing their schooling.

School offices also provide resources to students. The Nursing and Counseling offices are both involved in assisting students find success as they finish up their schooling. School counselors  even help young mothers with establishing daycare options and resources so they can finish their schooling.

Besides home support, teachers can play a huge factor when it comes to the success of graduating for a pregnant teen. Teachers can do many things to help teen parents succeed such as working with them before and after school, being flexible with their work due dates, and just being understanding about their circumstance. It’s important for students to share and discuss their situations with teachers to get the best supports they can to succeed at graduating and beyond.

Baltimore County also offers the option of night school to help students complete their coursework to graduate faster. MaryEllen Sittner, Kenwood’s STAT teacher, said, “Students who have no home support tend to struggle when graduating on time and may end up at night school.’’

Kenwood’s history teacher Jean Rodier said that helping teen parents succeed is her job as teacher, She provides  ‘’extra support inside and outside of the classroom’’ and  “understand it’s the teacher’s job to be prepared to help them catch back up when they return to school after the child is born.”

Facing parenthood before graduation may not be ideal to most, but it never has to be the reason to quit school. Young mothers should know their options and take advantage of the resources available to help them succeed.

Source: “Teen Pregnancy in the United States”. Teen Pregnancy. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 4 May 2017. Web 28 November 2018.